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Unlucky Louie, who could get backed into a corner in a round room, had quite an argument with today’s North.
Louie, South, opened two clubs, showed his spades and leaped to six hearts. When North returned to six spades, Louie subsided. West led the queen of diamonds, and when Louie saw dummy, he was aghast.
“I bid six spades by myself,” he said vehemently. “With the ace of spades, you must bid seven.”
“We’ll be lucky to make six,” North said gloomily.
Louie took the ace of diamonds and led the ace of hearts – and the argument dried up. East ruffed and led a trump, and since Louie had two low hearts and dummy had only one trump left, Louie lost a heart.
“I knew it,” said North, who was clearly aware of Louie’s track record.
Louie won the argument – North could have bid a grand slam – but lost his contract. At six spades he can lead a low heart at Trick Two. If West wins and leads a trump, Louie ruffs his last low heart with dummy’s ace of trumps.
You hold: ´ 7 6 5 3 ™ None © K 6 4 3 ® A J 8 5 2. Your partner opens one diamond. The next player doubles. What do you say?
A: If your opponent had passed, you could have bid one spade. But the doubler may have length and strength in spades, and the auction may turn competitive. Describe your hand to help partner judge. A bid of two clubs, a redouble, or a conventional bid of 2NT (showing a fair hand with diamond support) would get expert support.
South dealer
N-S vulnerable

NORTH
´ A 8
™ 4
© 10 8 7 5 2
® Q 10 6 4 3
WEST EAST
´ 2 ´ 7 6 5 3
™ 10 9 8 7 6 5 ™ None
© Q J 9 © K 6 4 3
® K 9 7 ® A J 8 5 2
SOUTH
´ K Q J 10 9 4
™ A K Q J 3 2
© A
® None

South West North East
2 ® Pass 2 © Pass
2 ´ Pass 3 ® Pass
6 ™ Pass 6 ´ All Pass
Opening lead – © Q