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SOMETHING TO READ

The Blackhope Enigma by Teresa Flavin; Candlewick Press, $15.99.

Fourteen-year-old Sunni Forest hopes to become an artist someday, and she is visiting legendary Blackhope Tower to sketch a copy of the painting, "The Mariner's Return to Arcadia, 1582," by her favorite artist for a school project when her annoying stepbrother suddenly vanishes from the labyrinth printed on the floor of the tower -- and ends up inside the painting. Sunni follows him into the painting to get him back -- and only her art classmate knows where both have gone.

This fascinating novel by a new author is a thrilling adventure of forgers, schemers and an artist who learned the secret of enchanting a painting and tried to keep his skill safe from spies who would copy his work. And nearly all the action takes place inside the painting, which holds layer upon layer of paint, some of the layers hiding dangerous beasts or sailing ships or other wonders.

-- Jean Westmoore

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SOMETHING TO DO

The popular Nickelodeon show "Max & Ruby" is coming to life on stage in a musical called "Max & Ruby: Bunny Party" at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Jamestown Savings Bank Arena, 319 W. Third St., Jamestown. Cost is $15-$20. For information, visit www.extremetix.com or www.maxandrubyontour.com.

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SOMETHING TO LEARN

Why do some planets have rings? Some planets act like a catcher's mitt. When small moons and comets get too close to a planet, gravity rips them apart. Bits of rock and ice begin orbiting the planet, eventually forming rings.

Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune have so much mass and so much gravity that they are able to hold onto their rings. If these planets were closer to the sun like the Earth, Venus and Mercury, the sun's gravitational pull would have shredded those rings to pieces.

-- Time Book of Why