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People on Abbott Road being treated unfairly

Not only has Rich Stadium changed its parking rules, but the Buffalo Bills have also influenced neighborhood traffic by closing Abbott Road. That may or may not be good for the Bills or its fans, but surely it's annoying to the people who live in the 52 homes neighboring the stadium. This new Disney-style system isolates residents of these homes and dramatically restricts their getting around because Abbott Road, their only outlet, is now closed to the immediate north.

That doesn't just mean that they're forced into one direction, it also means that their streets are now emptier when they're usually bustling with Sunday business. Now it barely matters how big or how clean their lawns are, or how much (or how less) they're charging to park, because Rich Stadium, by "improving" itself, has "fenced" them off. And this fence isn't making good neighbors. Not with those homes or the five or so business owners along Abbott Road who have purchased parking permits -- like they've done for decades -- in support of their team. The Buffalo Bills, unfortunately, aren't acting as neighborly. Shame on them.

Thomas Carrow

Owner, T.B. Automotive

Orchard Park

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Good luck with campaign to improve fan behavior

The new Bills campaign idea is ridiculous. The premise is this: When you get ready to do or say something stupid or vulgar, just imagine that your mother is watching and listening.

Really? Adult fans' behavior will improve by having them imagine their mother is watching? For years, I have said that all marketing campaigns are geared for 14-year-old boys, (especially TV commercials). This just proves my case.

Whatever happened to common decency, or behaving your age, not your shoe size? Are we so desperate for adults to grow up and behave like responsible people that we have to attempt to "shame" them by reminding them what their mothers taught them when they were 14 years old? What a joke! Good luck with that one.

Linda F. Smith

Depew

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Bills parking policy is long overdue at stadium

After working for the Buffalo Bills and its security force on game day for 18 seasons, as well as working for eight years on the parking lot security detail, I could not agree more with the Bills new parking policy.

Game days were a nightmare as fans would pull in, flying across the lots and taking no consideration into the safety of other fans who were out of their cars enjoying the pregame tailgate parties. The majority of the people who were in danger were the small children who were so excited/overwhelmed to be there and didn't pay attention to the surroundings. The crews from the parking company were often threatened by fans. That's when we had to respond to handle the situation.

The fans would park taking up three or four spaces, park sideways trying to reserve the space for friends. The parking crews only asked them to park straight, and pay for the other spaces they chose to "reserve," which created a nightmare in the lots as well as traffic jams. The fans also refused to pay for those spaces.

I have attended several events at other arenas, stadiums and parks in Western New York and elsewhere. Of them all, 95 percent of them have attendants who direct you to a parking space and that's where you park. End of story. You don't ignore them and pull off and go where you please, or the staff will respond with security and request you park where you were told, or ask you to leave the property.

So bravo to the Buffalo Bills for finally enforcing this. It should have been done years and years ago. If you don't like the rules, park someplace else. The Bills are not demanding you use their property, only that you follow their rules. There are many residents and businesses in the surrounding area selling parking spaces on their land -- go there.

Robert J. Marth

Buffalo

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Tea party comprised of ordinary people

I take issue with the views of a recent letter that appeared in Everybody's Column. More often than not people who believe that tea party members are terrorists are afraid of the real American view on how the government should be working.

I have belonged to every political party, and after finding many skewed ideas in each, I now an a non-affiliated voter. I am passionate about voting, as anyone should be about such a privilege. I research the candidate and the various parties' ideas about how our country should be maintaining its place in the world.

The present administration at the White House has been consistently taking us down the wrong path, a path that I believe leads to a socialistic society. The president has, since the beginning of his career, associated with sub-culture anarchists who in the past have burned buildings, taken up weapons and showed hatred for our American system. The president also counts as friends people with socialistic and communist beliefs.

The ordinary people have finally taken umbrage with the economic and social decline. These "ordinary people" call themselves the tea party. The name commemorates a time in history when people non-violently dumped tea into the ocean to protest the government not living up to a true America -- for the people.

Donna Capitano Nardozzi

Buffalo

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Let's not go back to age of 'Wild West'

I've finally figured out the philosophy of the tea party/conservative Republicans. Their idea of the heyday of our United States was during the age of the "Wild West." Those were the days of the individual. Your security was the six-gun at your side. The only government official of note was the sheriff. If you couldn't take care of yourself then, you either ended up on boot hill or you were a patsy to the faster gun. They want these days back.

They should be informed that those days are past. Today we take the words of our Constitution seriously. In part, it states, " establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity "

This is the world I want to live in where we enjoy personal liberty and also look out for one another.

David F. Baker

Buffalo

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It's foolish to compare teachers, police officers

When deciding a career path, one must take into consideration the pros and cons of a profession. I choose to be a nurse. I work long hours, get mandated to stay by the state and have no backup when it comes to mistakes, so I must carry my own insurance. I deal with the sick, unhappy, irate, dying and their entire families. I bring home illness and get exposed to things that would leave the ordinary individual in shock. I work weekends, holidays and summers. I am a nurse -- that is what I choose to do.

Lately, I have read a great deal about the plight of our teachers. I have also read the commentary from teachers themselves. I am left wondering why, in order to make their point, they must reference the New York State Police salaries and jobs. To me, that is like comparing apples and oranges.

My husband went into the military, then college, then spent six months away from our family to attend the very rigorous State Police Academy. He was sent to Thousand Islands for two years, again away from our family. When he made it back to Buffalo, he spent six months in the direct line of fire of a lunatic cop killer and had to defend himself from disgruntled people who were intent on preventing the capture of a fugitive. He pulls drunks off the roads, and arrests drug dealers, thieves and rapists, thus exposing himself to potential deadly consequences. It is his job, it is what he chose. He is not paid for the time it takes to prepare for a grand jury case or to indict a fatal DWI. He works 12-hour shifts, nights, weekends and holidays.

People choose to be teachers. They are paid well, have off weekends, holidays and summers, and have insurance. Make your point without comparing a teacher to a police officer or any other profession. It should not take 9/1 1 or what happened in Norway for us to remember that they run in when you are running out. Oh, yes, and be thankful you have a job -- I am.

Jill Gugino-Redman

Derby

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Give Dixon the job as new superintendent

The Buffalo Board of Education now begins yet another extensive search for a new school superintendent. Past searches have included some rather dubious choices with mixed results, at best. Perhaps it would be a nice change to look inward to a native of Buffalo, already familiar with the schools, who wouldn't require a learning and adjustment period.

Amber Dixon appears to be a rather good fit with rare approval from both the School Board and the teachers union. While obviously not a minority, as most of Buffalo's students, as a woman, she does reflect the majority of the Buffalo teachers and has experience as one of them. I cannot think of a better qualification.

Michael Panzica

Williamsville

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How can Collins claim parks are in top shape?

Here we go again. County Executive Chris Collins is totally unbelievable. Literally! He is now running ads on television stating that the county parks are in their best shape ever. Is he serious? Have you seen them? He obviously subscribes to the theory that if you tell a lie frequently enough, people will believe you.

Hey, Chris -- we are not that dumb. He constantly trashes Comptroller Mark Poloncarz, who is doing a terrific job. There are approximately 10 weeks to the election, 10 more weeks of distortions. Ugh. Give us a break. For a change, stick to the facts.

Linda C. Berman

Getzville

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Hydrofracking imperils most precious resource

I am disappointed by The News editorial approving the practice of hydro-fracking. The process, as stated, requires "vast quantities of water" to extract natural gas from the Marcellus Shale. Where will these "vast quantities" come from, and what will replace the water lost?

I am concerned about the chemicals used, the destruction of land and the possibility of accidental release of dangerous substances, but my chief concern is water, our most precious resource. The Great Lakes Commission will, I hope, study the issue and come out with an anti-fracking position. But bigwigs cannot always be trusted to do the right thing.

The use (and subsequent waste) of a resource essential to life must not be sacrificed in order to obtain a resource makes some of us comfortable or more efficient. Of what use is power when its users have begun writing their own death sentence?

Gay Baines

East Aurora