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Trail on old rail line would benefit citizens

Senior citizens should take note of the previous letters concerning a multiuse trail on the Buffalo and Pittsburgh Railroad corridor that runs through Concord, Colden, Aurora and Orchard Park. Substantial health benefits come from the increased physical activity of trail usage.

I am 77 years old and doing my best to stay healthy by walking and riding my bike. But finding a place to do this safely is difficult. Fast-moving cars and big trucks tend to keep me off the rural roads of Concord. The level railroad bed of the B&P corridor would be perfect for me, or anyone, wishing to safely walk, run or bike for health or pleasure.

It is well documented that people of all ages reap important health benefits from the use of a good trail. Since New York State funds can be used to acquire the property and federal highway funds can be used to build the trail, it sounds like a good deal to me.

The rail corridor is a valuable asset. Rather than allowing it to fall into rack and ruin, it should be used to benefit the communities through which it passes. This is an opportunity that must not be wasted. I urge the town councils of Concord and other towns along the corridor to approve the building of the trail for their communities.

Roy Loomis

Concord

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Israelis have offered Palestinians own state

A recent letter asserted that criticism of anti-Israel statements supported a David-versus-Goliath paradigm in which Israel can do no wrong. However, in correcting false anti-Israel statements mischaracterized as facts, the only paradigm being supported is "tell the truth."

For example, this same letter stated that Israel treats Palestinians ruthlessly. The truth is that Israel has offered Palestinians their own state several times, only to be answered ruthlessly with rockets, bombs and knives. The offers were not ruthless. The violent Palestinian responses were ruthless indeed.

Finally, this same letter complained of the effort required to produce anti-Israel statements, as compared to the supposed effortlessness of rebutting those statements. The truth is that no discourse of any value is effortless, but the workload can be eased if one bothers to check facts first.

Daniel H. Trigoboff

Amherst

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Wealthy gloss over realities of the past

Republican candidate Tim Pawlenty recently stated that President Obama is guilty of stoking the class-warfare fires. Those on the reactionary right never take credit for the reverse social engineering they have done since the New Deal was put into effect in an attempt to remedy the age old human nature staple of the wealthy and powerful elite suppressing those not in the top tier of the pyramid. No revolution was ever started by a poor, humanely treated people.

Wealthy, privileged reactionaries tend to gloss over the past and cast it in a rosier hue than facts really support. They would have people believe that all American families always ate together, lived in stable family units and enjoyed boundless middle-class opportunity and success. Few conservatives know or want to know anything about abandoned children, orphan trains, working and living conditions, the ability of owners in league with government to kill and maim workers asking for decent wages and dignified treatment in the work place.

Dangerous and ill-thought deregulation in search of profit for the few while waving flag and cross together do more to imperil this nation's future and historical promise than any national health care plan. Disagreement with the expanding body of evidence of climate change, without taking into account the growing world population's enormous contribution to and added stress of food, water supply and ecology, and not looking at any possible solution, is a victory for narrow-minded ideological ignorance.

Yes, it is plain to see that if only those dangerous liberal demagogues would stop inciting all those welfare queens, this nation could continue on its unchanging idyllic course of well-known freedoms and liberties. There is no class warfare; not when people have other immediate concerns such as food, shelter, jobs and a little security.

Thomas Druelinger

East Aurora

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Time to stop whining about the waterfront

The June 20 News article, "Plants fail to weather waterfront location," is another example of how many of us need to stop whining about the waterfront altogether. Any gardener knows that new plants require patience, especially with trees and shrubs. As the old saying goes, "the first year they creep, the second year they weep and the third year they leap!" As the article states, the 5 percent of the total plantings that died will be replaced for free anyway.

At The News website, this article received more than 15 responses. A couple of people complained that the waterfront now resembles a concrete jungle with the new outer harbor parkway. Fortunately, there are acres and acres of green land between the parkway and the lake where folks can exercise and have fun, unlike the Thruway and sewer plant that strangle the entire Buffalo section of the mighty Niagara River shoreline.

The Skyway is a blessing in disguise. When I don't want to visit the outer harbor but still want to enjoy the view, I can cruise over it at 60 mph without disturbing a soul. Someday a mass of people down there may pull a few of us off the Skyway to spend some money.

Tom Colligan

Angola

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Clinton shouldn't give Obama advice on jobs

The June 24 editorial, "Clinton's good ideas on jobs," made me laugh and I wanted to ask the writer: What side do you take?

The former president can offer as many initiatives as he wants to fellow Democrat President Obama and his administration, including Bill Clinton's latest 14 initiatives that were published in the Newsweek article, for putting the country back to work. He should also remind the citizens and labor unions that he signed NAFTA and the U.S.-China Relations Act of 2000.

Why wasn't Clinton focusing on the long-term effects these trade agreements will have on American labor and market issues? He gives no explanation to his measures; instead, he teaches Obama how to manage and expand the Civil Works Administration. More government jobs? More regulations and bureaucracy? It seems to me that Democrats are leaning more and more toward socialism. Personally, I've been there before I came to the free-market society. I don't want to witness that scenario again.

It's time for both Clinton and Obama to learn to focus on four dimensions: efficiency, calculability, predictability and control. It's time to cut spending and run government as a business.

Zanna Vaida

Lackawanna