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Wedding dinners catered outdoors are a kind of minor miracle of organization. They are essentially single-use banquet halls set out in the wilds, usually created and broken down in a day.

In between, they are designed to make dreams come true.

Making sure that happens falls to veteran wedding servers like Rose Bosco, who has been serving wedding parties for Quaker Bonnet for more than 20 years.

What's the perfect server?

You have to know when you're to be visible and when not to be visible. You have to be in front of the scenes and behind the scenes at the same time.

Tell me a disaster story.

We did an event one time when we had just enough glasses, an event way out somewhere, no coming back if something was left behind. (Quaker Bonnet owner) Liz (Kolken) was carrying all these big old trays full of glasses. She trips on a hose, breaks every glass.

What did you do?

She pulled it off. She went out to some dollar store and bought some more. People are paying a lot of money for their wedding. They want it to be perfect.

What's the No. 1 threat to outdoor weddings, from a caterer's perspective?

There was one time we had this wedding cake all ready to go. It was like 100 degrees outside. We got there and the cake kind of flopped a little bit.

Flopped a bit?

It was so hot out that the tiers kind of lowered themselves to a one-level cake. Things like that happen.

You can't control the outdoors.

We had one recently where there were flies. "Look at the flies on the food! Look at the bugs." You know, you chose this. It's 90 degrees outside, you have to expect this.

You try your best. You try to keep the food as cool and covered as you possibly can. You're outside, you can't beat every bit of nature.

What has your service career taught you about people?

That you can't please everybody. No matter how hard you try, how hard you smile, how polite you are. There's a certain type of person you just can't please.

What do you do?

You want to be an A-S-S, that's fine with me. I'm just going to smile and say, "Have a nice day." If you choose to, that's fine. If you don't, just go on in life like that.

Are you a good wedding guest yourself?

I find myself to be very critical of certain things. It's "We would have done it this way, or she should have brought that now." My husband's like, "Will you shut up? You're not working."

e-mail: agalarneau@buffnews.com